Ottawa’s Most Famous Martial Arts Family

Tina Takahashi Family
Canada’s Most succesfull Mixed Martial arts Family.

Masao Takahashi sensei
1929-2020
8th Degree Kodokan Black Belt, Hall of Famer Member, Nato Air Force Combat Instructor, Judo Pioneer & Legend

Takahashi sensei was born in Stave Falls B.C, on June 24, 1929, starting judo at eight years old. As a teenager, he and his family were expelled from B.C. and relocated to a sugar beet farm in Alberta as part of the internment of Japanese Canadians during WWII. At the end of the war, he completed school and enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1949. Mas enjoyed an illustrious military career stationed in Eastern Canada, and four years in Germany where he taught Judo and unarmed combat and started his young family in judo. Mas retired from the Air Force in 1972 and devoted much of the next phase of his life to the judo school he opened in 1969. Mas was a fierce competitor and impressive technician and instructor who instilled his passion for judo in his four children and their children. Hundreds of students have since earned black belts, became great competitors, instructors of clubs, coaches and Olympians, achieving national and international success. He was an official at the ’76 Olympic Games his two sons competed in the Olympics twice, Phil in judo, Ray in wrestling and daughter, Tina was a World University Champion, World Sambo Champion and Olympic Women’s Judo Coach.

 

Masao sensei one of the first to achieve Canadian and Kodokan 8th degree Black Belt. Inducted into the Judo Ontario and Judo Canada Hall of Fame along with his son and daughter and has been inducted into the Canadian Sports Honour Roll. In 2002, he was decorated by the Emperor of Japan with the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold Rays with Rosette, in recognition of his service to improving the status of Japanese-Canadians through his lifelong commitment to the promotion and development of Judo in Canada.

For more information Call or Text Sean MacFadyen sensei at 613-762-2316

Tina Takahashi Martial Arts, 1061 Merivale rd., Ottawa, Ont., K1Z-6A9, Canada.

 

 

The Importance of Developing a Child’s Focus

One of the most common problems that many children have is in focusing on particular tasks for long periods of time. Developing memory, focus, and attention spans when a child is between the ages of three and five is very important. As a parent or a pre-school teacher, one has to constantly monitor and observe a child, to deduce whether he or she is adequately developing these skills. Doing so will ensure that in the future, when a child is required to deal with large tasks and projects, he or she will be able to “apply” the mind for longer periods of time and yield greater results. Structured, enjoyable activities such as pre-school karate help children learn to focus on the task at hand.

Effects of Technology

Some experts have concluded that the reason why many children today have trouble focusing on tasks for long periods is due to a ‘glancing culture’ that has proliferated as technology
has advanced. The ways in which they interact with digital media have by and large reduced their ability to focus on ordinary or repetitive tasks, and to persevere through less stimulating activities like studying. Video games and social media like Facebook and Twitter can be entertaining and educational, but aside from specific applications, they generally do not assist with cognitive development in a child. In the past, children were encouraged to play games that build cognition among other skills, but that trend has diminished across the United States.

The ability to focus on a particular task, project, or lesson has a direct bearing on the amount of information a growing child can retain and later apply. The capacity to filter out irrelevant distraction and tune oneself to a particular project helps develop self-control in a child as well.

(Good and Consistent) Practice Makes Perfect

Developing a child’s focus is like developing any kind of muscle in the body. More than anything, it takes a whole lot of practice! Parents and pre-school teachers are advised to schedule tasks and activities that help develop a child’s mental faculties. In certain cases, this may be as simple as scheduling time slots where children are required to play particular cognition-building games such as puzzles, riddles, brainteasers, and so on. Some experts believe that even a few moments of silent meditation can do wonders for developing a child’s ability to focus.

While it is extremely important to ensure that children are integrating skills that allow them to focus, one should also keep in mind that they may get exhausted from time to time as well. As a parent or a pre-school teacher, one should regularly schedule breaks where children can relax and rejuvenate both body and mind between tasks.

How to Develop Independence in Your Child

Among the challenges and joys of parenthood are raising, providing for, and taking care of a young child. Parents develop intensely strong bonds doing things for our children especially during the infant and toddler years, though it is important to know where to draw the line. Doing everything for a child could eventually result in his or her inability to develop particular life skills that will be needed later on in life. As a parent, it is important to strike a keen balance between taking care of your child and fostering a sense of independence and self-reliance.

Even from the youngest age, a child will naturally try to gain some form of independence. Independence traits in a child may be exhibited in small ways, such as insisting on choosing their own clothes, pouring their own beverages, or even going to the bathroom unaccompanied. As a parent, it is crucial that you encourage the choices that your child makes (when appropriate) rather than continually questioning or discouraging them.

Different kinds of independence

Developing self-reliant children can occur in a variety of ways. In many households, children are required to perform tasks on their own just as a matter of circumstance or style of living. In these cases, independence becomes quite a natural trait, leading to children becoming intrinsically motivated. Professionally-supervised activities that focus on self-improvement, such as karate training, are proven to give children a sense of independence and individual accomplishment.

In other cases, developing a child’s sense of independence may require parents to provide some kind of incentive or reward, like a trip to the park or arcade, an extra hour of TV time, or similar. Parents need to be careful in choosing the rewards, though: over-rewarding can be as detrimental to his or her developmental processes as neglecting to offer praise and feedback at all.

Balancing love and practicality

Ultimately, developing a sense of independence in your child means striking a keen balance between supporting them 100% and giving them the freedom to win or lose on their own occasionally. These two sides of the parenting coin are not mutually exclusive. Understanding the cognitive development level of your child at each age is also important, especially when it comes to choosing which tasks you would like your child to perform independently and which tasks he or she will still require some assistance with. As a child grows and becomes familiar with performing certain tasks on his or her own, you can then encourage them to get involved with more complex tasks to further build their independence quotient.

Developing an Attitude of Positivity in Your Child

In life, everyone faces ups and downs all the time. Very rarely do things go exactly according to the plans that we have laid out for ourselves, and more often than not, we have to adapt to different situations as best we can. However, many people – adults included – find it extremely difficult to maintain a positive outlook in the face of an obstacle, change, or setback. One of the key traits of the most successful people in the world is the ability to remain optimistic and hopeful, committing to persevere in the face of adversity.

For a better future

Teaching children how to have a positive attitude for approaching life situations at the earliest ages will do wonders for their growth in the future. Fortunately there are some simple ways that parents can help their children realize the true worth of having a positive attitude – and sticking by it – especially when the chips are down.

Some experts have suggested that one of the best ways that children learn about positive attitudes is simply observing and discussing behaviors of positive people around them. As a parent, you may want to periodically encourage your child to to think about how certain ‘optimistic’ or ‘positive’ people in their lives are similar. In doing so, a child may come to realize a number of similarities and choose to develop those positive traits in themselves.

Keeping track

Another important technique that parents use is encouraging their children to keep track of their attitudes from day to day. Does a child behave differently on different days? Which attitude makes them happier? Moreover, when facing a difficulty, is there something a child can do to turn his or her attitude around? Can they influence the attitudes of their teammates or opponents? Over time, children will be able to better answer these questions to the point where the lessons become internalized. Taking up classes like music or karate will help boost the spirit, language, and environment of positivity in your child.

Finally, having a positive attitude also means taking responsibility for the particular situation that one is in. A parent should encourage his or her child to think about the ways in which an obstacle can be conquered, rather than just telling him or her what to do. Children must learn to view difficulties as challenges rather than anchors in their lives, and tackle them head on. It is the most gratifying thing to have conquered hardships on one’s own.